Tag Archives: ANIMALS

ANTHROPOMORMPHIC TAXIDERMY



My favorite part is when the artist talks about preserving the creature that had either died of natural causes or that was bred for feeding is being immortalized by these stories and used in this new context within artistic narratives and story telling. Anthropomorphic Taxidermy, as Sue will explain is the process of taking an animal’s skin, preparing it, and putting it in a human-like setting.

RACHEL MEULER



Rachel Meuler
Birdcage Twinsies
watercolor, gouache, and ink on stretched paper
8″ x 8″
2010



Rachel Meuler
Tumor Toadstool
watercolor, gouache, and ink on stretched paper
8″ x 8″
2010



Rachel Meuler
Condor Pointer
watercolor, gouache, and ink on stretched paper
10″ x 10″
2010

Rachel Meuler, born in Louisville, is a multidisciplinary artist working with drawing and painting, sculpture and installation, and costume-oriented performance art. She received her BFA in Sculpture from the Kansas City Art Institute in 1999, her MFA in Sculpture from SUNY Purchase in 2001, and has been living and working in New York City since.

Meuler has been an artist in residence at the Millay Colony for the Arts, Skidmore College, and the Abrons Art Center of the Henry Street Settlement. Her work is included in several slide registries, including the Drawing Center’s Viewing Program, was recently exhibited in a solo show at Rabbithole Gallery, and has been featured in Glasschord and Cultrehall Magazines.

Her work is informed by the fears and fantasies of contemporary culture. The specimen-like portraits and narratives of hybrid creatures speak to the painful beauty of individual struggle and evolutionary anomalies.

WALTON FORD

“At first glance, Walton Ford’s large-scale, highly-detailed watercolors of animals may recall the prints of 19th century illustrators John James Audubon and Edward Lear, and others of the colonial era. But a closer look reveals a complex and disturbingly anthropomorphic universe, full of symbols, sly jokes, and allusions to the ‘operatic’ nature of traditional natural history themes. The beasts and birds populating this contemporary artist’s life-size paintings are never mere objects, but dynamic actors in allegorical struggles: a wild turkey crushes a small parrot in its claw; a troupe of monkeys wreak havoc on a formal dinner table, an American buffalo is surrounded by bloodied white wolves. The book’s title derives from The Pancha Tantra, an ancient Indian book of animal tales considered the precursor to Aesop’s Fables.” – Taschen Books